Moving Workshop, Again

10

Stable workshop in ned of a new door

This week we’ve finally come to the end of a back-log of work that I should never have taken on. Don’t worry, I’ll have a  jolly good moan about all that soon.

Working on our barns is a bit like one of those games, where you have to slide a piece out of position, to move another one round, and hopefully, with a bit of faffing about, you get a full picture. I haven’t a clue what that game’s called, but I’m sure you know what I mean.

We’ve decided that now is a good time to switch my work area from one barn to another.
Our current workshop has about 1000 square feet of usable space. But, it’s becoming more and more mixed use, since we’re so limited on good, dry buildings at the moment.

This next move is for creating a space that gives the videos and the blog, a dedicated, uninterrupted area of their own.
This current barn is ancient. It’s also large, tall and open, which makes it hard to cordon areas off, or to do a good job of sound proofing and keeping the out doors out in general. And that includes a donkey.

Vacating this larger, older barn will leave it ready for some much needed work next year. Work that needs to be done right.

Whilst not vastly smaller in floor space, the new-to-be workshop is a lot lower and also half as old, making it a little less of a relic. The solid, 18″ thick brick walls are also in very good condition.

barn workshop ready for renovation

Overall it’s going to be a lot simpler to fully sound proof, and I’m looking forward to having a dedicated workshop again.
Making videos will become a lot easier, particularly the spur of the moment Rants that we want to start up again for the blog.

Of course, this isn’t going to be as simple as pallet trucking a workbench, and traipsing a chest full of tools over there. Whilst the building is structurally sound; including a good roof, there’s still a lot to do.

I’ve already had to smash the floor right out, it must have been about two foot thick.
Next there’s the roof to insulate and sound proof, then there’s the matter of having no electricity yet.
And finally there’s a door and frame to build, along with some windows (more to follow on those).

So I’m having this weekend off. I might go on one of my nutty walks of something. And Monday, I start… should have it all done by dinner.

We're definately going to need a new window

10 Responses

  1. Len

    And the very best of luck with that Richard and Helen. Look forward to future rants and also the building of window frames. I recall my grandad making oak window frames for the cottage they had just moved into back in 1963/64. It gave him a new lease of life and a purpose once more. He would have been 74 at the time. I am thrilled to now be using some of those same tools today. A real privilege.

    Len

    Reply
  2. Nelly

    Again, would love some video of doors and windows.
    Now I feel I’m nagging. Better go to sleep.
    Maybe the English word I look for is some other than nagging?
    Sleep. Yes. Sleep.

    Reply
  3. Ken

    I just love outbuildings. I think I’d settle for a bunch of them instead of a house.

    When I built my workshop I found collecting useful info on soundproofing quite hard. It all seemed a bit vague even when you fought your way past the techy stuff and the marketing wibble. But it worked out well in the end.
    Your 18″brick walls (never seen that in such a low structure)| shouldn’t need any help keeping noise out. Roofs are harder because sound proofing materials tend to be heavy. Do you have a soundproofing plan?

    Reply
  4. Brad

    “… should have it all done by dinner.” reminds me of a goon show episode. When told that a full sized replica of the Mary Celeste would be finished after dinner, Neddy replied “You’ll have the whole ship completed after dinner? What’s the delay?”
    The response: “The wood, you can’t get the wood you know.”

    So, all the best. 🙂

    Reply
  5. Carsten

    Good luck from Germany! Lot of work… Many Regards from Germany, Carsten

    Reply
  6. Robert Robinson

    Lots of luck from Perth Western Australia and I wish that I was your age again so I could come over and lend a helping hand.

    Reply
  7. Glen C

    I just needed to ask…

    How much of it did you have done before dinner, two weeks later?

    Heh heh. You must have been starving.

    Reply
  8. Christopher Johnston

    I am building the English workbench and I have to say one thing .Thank you for showing the old holdfast and batten .I for one will NOT be spending money on a tail vice.This is so versatile and quick ,I am just going to use it,and see how I go.

    Reply

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